Black and White (Jane Doe Flash Fiction)

Becca heaves her bag onto her shoulder, making sure she has her lunch, her phone, her bus pass. Another Monday. Joy.

Out of the elevator, she pauses at the door to the street, looking down.

New shoes. Brilliant new shoes. Stylish new shoes. Affordable new shoes. Comfy new shoes. She couldn’t wait to wear them. Brilliant black, blinding white. Wannabe swoosh.

And before she walks an entire block in the Pacific Northwest wet, the black and white will be gray all over. Ruined.

“…point of having shoes I can’t even wear outside,” she mutters, heading back up to change.

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Each week at the Ranch, Charli Mills hosts a flash fiction challenge. This week’s prompt: “In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story that features something black and white. It could be a nun in a zebra monster truck, a rigid way of thinking, a bird in a tuxedo — be imaginative and go where the prompt leads.”

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Style Over Substance (Jane Doe Six Sentence Stories)

“But I’m not sure I want to actually marry him,” Kathy finishes.

“Well, what kind of wedding can he afford to give you?” Torrey asks. “Can he give you Vera Wang and live doves in Rome?”

“It’s him I’m considering, not Rome,” Kathy retorts.

“Oh, honey, you don’t say yes to the man. You say yes to the dress.”

MichaelGaida
Photo: MichaelGaida

Every week, Ivy at Uncharted hosts the Six Sentence Stories flash fiction linkup and blog hop. This week’s cue was DRESS. Fun sixes from other writers are at the link. Join us! It’s fun!

Artemis by Andy Weir (Book Review)

ArtemisArtemis by Andy Weir

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I adored The Martian. I loved it so much I neglected important things like a research paper with a looming deadline and clean socks and sleep, because I couldn’t put it down. So at the same time I looked forward to reading Artemis, I dreaded it. I knew that The Martian was going to be a tough act to follow.

And I was right. The storytelling is just as good, but Jazz Bashara is no Mark Watney. I see the free-wheeling spirit, the principled criminal, the grudge-nursing, heartbroken, sarcastic introvert with the heart of gold, but the “Pants on fire!” “You take that back!” type of exchanges she often had with people were a turnoff. She carried her flip and biting remarks too far and I spent a lot of time wanting to knock her on her ass–fairly easy to do in 1/6 gravity. It felt like Weir was trying to put the spirit of Mark Watney into a female character, and it came off forced.

Still, it’s a good enough story. The science is made interesting and is simplified enough for my non-science brain to follow. I love heist stories. I think Weir gave us a realistic portrait of what life on the Moon would really be like physically – a lot to get used to and much less romantic than we tend to think of it. The pacing is good, the characters are good, and the setting is excellent. It’s an entertaining read, and I might be rating it higher if I hadn’t had the amazingness of The Martian to hold it up against.

Bookshelves: outer-space, futuristic, the-big-heist, adventure, heroine-kicking-ass

Join me on Goodreads: View all my reviews

The Edge (Jane Doe Flash Fiction)

Jane is halfway across the bridge when the panic hits. Suddenly she is gasping, hot, her hands clammy and her mouth dry.  She barely catches herself from bolting backward, right into rush-hour traffic. She clutches at the fencing with one sweaty hand, her eyes drawn over the edge.

Why not? How long can she keep trying, keep losing? The open air calls beyond the chain-link mesh, beckoning to the water far below. It would be hard, and it would be cold, and then it wouldn’t. And for a few seconds, she would be flying.

Would it be so bad?

rkit
Photo: rkit

This week’s flash fiction challenge prompt at the Ranch: “In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story that goes to the edge. Consider what the edge might be and how it informs the story. Go where the prompt leads.”

Stone Cold #Twitterflash (Jane Doe Flash Fiction)

Over at the Ranch, @Charli_Mills and @CJaiFerry are giving us monthly #Twitterflash challenges. January’s prompt: In a single tweet, write a story about seeing coldness in a new light. Extra challenge one: Realizing a tweet’s limit of 280 characters includes spaces. Extra challenge two: Realizing the hashtag takes up 13 of those characters. Yowza!

Stranger in Paradise by Robert B. Parker (Book Review)

Stranger In Paradise (Jesse Stone, #7)Stranger In Paradise by Robert B. Parker

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

So. I like Jesse and his department and I love Molly and Suit, and I like Paradise and the people in it, and the mysteries are entertaining, and I love RBP’s writing. But I cannot stand Jenn. I cannot stand Jesse’s obsession with this bimbo. I. Can’t. Stand. It. She annoys the living crap out of me every time I read one of these books. And every time I finish one, I’m sure that’s the last one I’ll read because I cannot take one more page of Jenn, and then I turn right around and check out the next book, hoping this time it’s what I want it to be.

Huh. Just like how Jesse is with Jenn.

Did you do that on purpose, RBP? Nice one. But it’s still pissing me off.

<checks out the next Jesse Stone novel against her will>

Bookshelves: detective, popcorn-reading, love-hate-relationship, mystery

Join me on Goodreads: View all my reviews

These Boots Are Made For… (Jane Doe Flash Fiction)

Jane shrinks back into her corner, trying for invisibility. Office birthdays. She hates them.

She hides behind her slice of cake, eying the other women, each one wearing fashion boots with the onset of autumn. Ankle-high, calf-high, thigh-high, like who thinks those are appropriate unless your job title is Dominatrix? Black, brown, trimmed with fur, leopard pattern, silver work, buckles. All sleek, all stylish. All expensive.

She shoves her own feet back under her chair, hoping no one has noticed the clunky black Wellies she was fortunate enough to find at the thrift store.

Her luxury is dry feet.

StockSnap

Every week, Charli Mills hosts a flash fiction challenge at the Ranch. This week’s prompt: “In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story that includes boots. Whose boots are they, where do they go and what is their significance? Go where the prompt leads.”